New website online Pan Salvage

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Pan Salvage also follows the trends and had a new website developed by KIKmediazone
The site is viewable both on your PC and mobile so you can always have a look at the site of Pan Salvage, even if you are not just sitting behind a computer.

Currently we are working hard on the English version, but you can already use the Dutch version.

KIKmediazone has also Social Media channels arranged and Pan Salvage is therefore also on Facebook and Twitter.

If you really don't want to miss a thing, you can also subscribe to the newsletter.

We thank Pan Salvage for this contract and the fine cooperation.

Pan Salvage recovers fishinggear OD17

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On April 8, we received the question, can you pick up a sumwing with an electric fishing gear that jammed in a wreck 80 miles to England, heading 260.

It is located about 50m deep. To do the recovery with divers wasn't an option, because to work with divers we need too have a ship / barge with four-point anchoring and deco tank.

We assigned the job from Hebo Maritime.

fortunately we had some time to do shopping and load fresh water and to fix some leakage on the grab because we had to wait until the next high tide.

At 22.00 we were leaving. The next morning at 6:00 on the spot and with the multibeam sonar started looking for the wreck.

After 1.5 hours we found the wreck and could make a very clear image of it.

The wreck was not long, about 34 meters . Proportionally, it was very high 10.20m and surrounded by a scour many feet deeper than the surrounding. The wreck is laying West / East.

First we anchored over the wreck with the current tide still going south. This gives a risk in both the anchor, wire and the umbilical (the combination of hydraulic hoses and electric cable) to be jammed in the wreck.

As the wind was favorable, we could change the anchor around quickly to the other side when the tide was turning. Soon the wreck was visible again through the underwater cameras.

The steel wire of the OD17, who had lost the fishinggear seemed to fit tight on a part of the wreck looking like a comanding tower of a submarine? .....

The net was quickly visable on the screens in the waiilhouse, but the sumwing was almost entirely covered by the net, which make it difficult to grab the sumwing on the shoe (an prefferable piece in the middle of the sumwing to avoid damage).

The grabber regularly bounced against a piece of the wreck that was in the way. And we saw that one of the tines of the grab had some damage! We put the grab on the deck, and found out that one of the hydraulic cylinders was broken away from the eye.

It took 2.5 hours and some concentration to properly fix it but we could do it on deck in the middle of the sea. Thanks to this repair we can ccould continue and grab the sumwing properly.

The sumwing and nets were so tight in the wreck that we had to pull very hard (later found out that it just sat around a heavy steel strip). We pulled so hard that the water was flush with the deck, the sumwing came a little loose and a little later completely . That was a relief, because there was so much tension that we could break our own material

We carefully took the combination on board and sail back toghether with the OD17 to Stellendam, Thursday, April 10 we arrived back in the harbor at 02.00. The OD17 has came along side here and took over the fishinggear in the middle of the night.

It was a fast action in almost one day.

Of course we would have liked to take a good look around that mysterious wreck, which OD17 did not see on the map and which also was hundreds of feet away from the first known wreck on the official chart

Meanwhile, we found that the wreck is the bow section of the SS Duke of York wich on May 6 1953 was in collision with Haiti Victory.

A video of this incident can be seen on the Internet at the following link : Click Here

Healthy Seas successful pilot

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23 september 2013 PRESS RELEASE, HEALTHY SEAS
ECNC Group, Aquafil en Star Sock

The Healthy Seas initiative celebrates the succesful pilot in the North Sea: 20 tons of lost fishing nets were recovered last year. These nets are stored in the depot Healthy Seas in Scheveningen. On September 24, these networks will be transported to Slovenia, where they are recycled to Econyl. Due to this Healthy Seas initiative which can expand to other pilots in the Adriatic Sea and the Mediterranean.

The first phase of the Healthy Seas initiative focused primarily on activities in the North Sea ( Netherlands and Belgium ). Groups of divers have been active for the past few summers as many nets were recovered, from the North Sea. Saturday was the last dive mission of the season. The net salvage operation was conducted off the coast of Scheveningen by Pan Salvage. Four divers for inspection, two photographers and an archaeologist. Through this action, approximately 4 ton of nets were added to the depot. The initiative was made possible by the National Postcode Lottery.

On 24 September, the 20 tons nets from the Healthy Seas depot in Scheveningen are retrieved by Nofir and are offered at the factory Aquafil in Slovenia for recycling.

New partners
In addition to the three founders , the Healthy Seas initiative is open to other partners such as companies, NGOs and stakeholders. During the international Healthy Seas kick off on 4 and 5 October in Slovenia we will officially welcome our two new partners : Norsk Fiskeriretur AS ( Nofir ) is a national recycling system for the Norwegian fisheries and aquaculture industry . They collect the discarded gear from various places along the Norwegian coast. Fonda Fish farm grows fish in ecological conditions : meshed cages float freely in the open water of a fish reserve in the Bay of Piran in Slovenia.

Healthy Seas
The main objective of Healthy Seas - a journey from waste-to- wear by removing waste and re-use. This applies in particular to fishing nets from the European seas. The losses of fishing nets is a big problem. According to a joint report by the FAO and UNEP, approximately 640,000 tons of fishing nets are in the oceans, accounting for one-tenth of all litter. These nets remain for hundreds of years in the marine ecosystem and many animals such as dolphins, turtles, crabs and sea birds get caught and die. Extracted nets from the sea are often dumped in landfills or burned, but as part of the Healthy Seas initiative will be processed into yarn Econyl, a high-quality raw material with which new products such as socks, swimwear, underwear or carpets can be manufactured.
www.healthyseas.org

Contact
Vereniging Kust & Zee (onderdeel van de ECNC Group)
Joos Versfelt j.versfelt@kustenzee.nl, 06 44650805
Photo's are downloadable via healthyseas.org/press/

Healthy Seas successful pilot

post-image-1


The Healthy Seas initiative celebrates the succesful pilot in the North Sea: 20 tons of lost fishing nets were recovered last year. These nets are stored in the depot Healthy Seas in Scheveningen. On September 24, these networks will be transported to Slovenia, where they are recycled to Econyl. Due to this Healthy Seas initiative which can expand to other pilots in the Adriatic Sea and the Mediterranean.

The first phase of the Healthy Seas initiative focused primarily on activities in the North Sea ( Netherlands and Belgium ). Groups of divers have been active for the past few summers as many nets were recovered, from the North Sea. Saturday was the last dive mission of the season. The net salvage operation was conducted off the coast of Scheveningen by Pan Salvage. Four divers for inspection, two photographers and an archaeologist. Through this action, approximately 4 ton of nets were added to the depot. The initiative was made possible by the National Postcode Lottery.

On 24 September, the 20 tons nets from the Healthy Seas depot in Scheveningen are retrieved by Nofir and are offered at the factory Aquafil in Slovenia for recycling.

New partners
In addition to the three founders , the Healthy Seas initiative is open to other partners such as companies, NGOs and stakeholders. During the international Healthy Seas kick off on 4 and 5 October in Slovenia we will officially welcome our two new partners : Norsk Fiskeriretur AS ( Nofir ) is a national recycling system for the Norwegian fisheries and aquaculture industry . They collect the discarded gear from various places along the Norwegian coast. Fonda Fish farm grows fish in ecological conditions : meshed cages float freely in the open water of a fish reserve in the Bay of Piran in Slovenia.

Healthy Seas
The main objective of Healthy Seas - a journey from waste-to- wear by removing waste and re-use. This applies in particular to fishing nets from the European seas. The losses of fishing nets is a big problem. According to a joint report by the FAO and UNEP, approximately 640,000 tons of fishing nets are in the oceans, accounting for one-tenth of all litter. These nets remain for hundreds of years in the marine ecosystem and many animals such as dolphins, turtles, crabs and sea birds get caught and die. Extracted nets from the sea are often dumped in landfills or burned, but as part of the Healthy Seas initiative will be processed into yarn Econyl, a high-quality raw material with which new products such as socks, swimwear, underwear or carpets can be manufactured.
www.healthyseas.org